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Whale watching

Overberg Whale Route

(July-November)

Southern Right Whales start arriving in Walker Bay from June every year. Hermanus is being acknowledged by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) as one of the 12 best whale-viewing sites in the world.  From its rocky cliffs, whales can be seen from as close as 5 metres.  By blowing a dried kelp horn, the world's only Whale Crier keeps us informed of the whereabouts of these massive mammals.

Our trip can include a scenic coastal drive, walk in the Fernkloof Nature Reserve, with unrivalled views of Walker Bay, lunch at one of the many sea-food restaurants, whale watching along the 12 km-long scenic cliff path and a return drive along Houwhoek and Sir Lowrey's Passes.


West Coast Whale Route

(July-November)

Combine a whale watching trip along the West Coast with a visit to the West Coast National Park and the Postberg Nature Reserve to view spectacular displays of wild flowers (August - September). Southern Right Whales can be seen in sheltered bays all along the West Coast, and their locality, as well as the weather conditions and the availability of wild flowers on the particular day of the trip, will dictate the route that we will take.

A lunch stop at one of many fine restaurants will be included. Time permitting, we can also visit the West Coast Fossil Park. Our trip will be concluded with a photo-stop and sundowners at Blouberg Beach, with its magnificent view of Table Mountain.

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Eco-Information on the Western Cape, South Africa.
The Succulent Karoo is one of 25 internationally recognised biodiversity hotspots, and the only arid hotspot in the world. Succulent Karoo has the highest number of plant species of any semi-arid area, many of which are rare and endangered, and has the richest succulent flora in the world.

Semi-desert climatic conditions prevail, with less than 250mm of rainfall per year that falls predominantly in winter. Vegetation is sparse, dominated by dwarf scrubs of which most have succulent leaves. The most common of its succulent, or fleshy leaved plants are mesembs (Mesembryanthemaceae), commonly known as 'vygies'.

There are more than 2 000 different species of mesembs in South Africa, of which many occur in the Western Cape. Other succulent families include the Aloes, Haworthias, Crassulas, Euphorbias and Stapeliads. The Succulent Karoo is also very rich in geophytes, with spectacular displays in spring.